Are you due for a pertussis vaccine? Read on and find out. . .

I am a family physician who also performs obstetrics.  And, as such, I keep up with  pregnancy-related updates, too.  There is a new indication for the TdaP (Tetanus with pertussis) vaccine.

  • Pregnant women in their third trimester.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (the two organizations who review vaccine practices) suggest the TdaP vaccine to be given during pregnancy instead of afterwards.  This TdaP vaccine is intended to prevent tetanus AND pertussis (whooping-cough) in the mothers and their newborns.  The TdaP vaccine should replace one dose of Td (tetanus) and preferably be given in the late second or third trimester (meaning after 20 weeks into the pregnancy).
  • Adolescents and adults in contact with infants younger than one year.  This is in response to a recent pertussis outbreak with hospitalizations and deaths in young children.
  • For adults who are due for their every-ten-year tetanus vaccine.  Once as an adult a TdaP (tetanus with pertussis) vaccine should be given instead of the Td (tetanus alone).

And, yes, the vaccination of pregnant women for Tdap is thought to be safe for
both mother and fetus.

So, consider getting a vaccine while pregnant or if you have contact with a child under the age of one–to keep you both safe and healthy.

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About drlesliegreenberg

I have been practicing as a family physician for over 20 years--as both an educator of physicians and clinician. From infancy to the elderly, I perform obstetrics and general medicine. I love my career and am passionate about my field of knowledge and my patients. Follow me on Facebook at Leslie Md Greenberg Medical Disclaimer The content of this website is provided for general informational purposes only and is not intended as, nor should it be considered a substitute for, professional medical advice. Do not use the information on this website for diagnosing or treating any medical or health condition. If you have or suspect you have a medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider.
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